ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »

Bravo

(via roseyvalentine)

"Before leaving the question of divorce, I should like to distinguish two things which are very often confused. The Christian conception of marriage is one: the other is the quite different question - how far Christians, if they are voters or Members of Parliament, ought to try to force their views of marriage on the rest of the community by embodying them in the divorce laws. A great many people seem to think that if you are a Christian yourself you should try to make divorce difficult for everyone. I do not think that. At least I know I should be very angry if the Mohammedans tried to prevent the rest of us from drinking wine. My own view is that the Churches should frankly recognise that the majority of the British people are not Christians and, therefore, cannot be expected to live Christian lives. There ought to be two distinct kinds of marriage: one governed by the State with rules enforced on all citizens, the other governed by the Church with rules enforced by her on her own members. The distinction ought to be quite sharp, so that a man knows which couples are married in a Christian sense and which are not."

— C. S. Lewis
Mere Christianity

This is the most beautiful thing ever made.

(Source: sizvideos, via ciltoris)

theoxfordamerican:

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Eyes on the South: Warren Thompson

With the series Postcards, Florida-based artist Warren Thompson looks at the roadside curiosities throughout the South. His work uses a combination of text and color that forms a distinctly Southern narrative of religion and leisure. Read more….

(via npr)

vintageanchorbooks:

1. St. Louis, MO

2. Cincinnati, OH

3. Pittsburgh, PA

4. Atlanta, GA

5. Orlando, FL

6. Minneapolis, MN

7. Buffalo, NY

8. Denver, CO

9. Seattle, WA

10. San Francisco, CA

ambereubanks84 St. Louis is racking up points.

(via npr)

On The First Day Of Spring

fakescience:

On The First Day Of Spring

I understand their plight

(Source: fakescience)

nprmusic:

If you haven’t seen Future Islands’ Letterman performance, you really, really should. —Lars

I can’t look away, no matter how hard I try.

nprmusic:

If you haven’t seen Future Islands’ Letterman performance, you really, really should. —Lars

I can’t look away, no matter how hard I try.

(Source: lateshowletterman)

agreekdoctor:

beyondtheoath:

compoundfractur:

image

I often see the caduceus used as a symbol of medicine on everything from association logos to tattoos. I mean look at it, it’s a pretty cool symbol. Too bad it’s not the ancient symbol of medicine, and actually represents everything medicine shouldn’t be.

What am I talking about? The caduceus…

Hence why my avatar is what it is.

Let it not go unmentioned that the Rod of Asclepius, and not the Caduceus, is the symbol of Osteopathic Medicine, which the original poster failed to mention.

I think it’s pretty telling that the osteopathic profession chose the Rod of Asclepius. :)

As did EMS

(Source: ragincontagion, via hillaryghoul)

cixous:

BLUEBIRD

there’s a bluebird in my heart that wants to get out but I’m too tough for him, I say, stay in there, I’m not going to let anybody see you. there’s a bluebird in my heart that wants to get out but I pour whiskey on him and inhale cigarette smoke and the whores and the bartenders and the grocery clerks never know that he’s in there. there’s a bluebird in my heart that wants to get out but I’m too tough for him, I say, stay down, do you want to mess me up? you want to screw up the works? you want to blow my book sales in Europe? there’s a bluebird in my heart that wants to get out but I’m too clever, I only let him out at night sometimes when everybody’s asleep. I say, I know that you’re there, so don’t be sad. then I put him back, but he’s singing a little in there, I haven’t quite let him die and we sleep together like that with our secret pact and it’s nice enough to make a man weep, but I don’t weep, do you?


My favorite Bukowski poem.

cixous:

BLUEBIRD

there’s a bluebird in my heart that
wants to get out
but I’m too tough for him,
I say, stay in there, I’m not going
to let anybody see
you.
there’s a bluebird in my heart that
wants to get out
but I pour whiskey on him and inhale
cigarette smoke
and the whores and the bartenders
and the grocery clerks
never know that
he’s
in there.

there’s a bluebird in my heart that
wants to get out
but I’m too tough for him,
I say,
stay down, do you want to mess
me up?
you want to screw up the
works?
you want to blow my book sales in
Europe?
there’s a bluebird in my heart that
wants to get out
but I’m too clever, I only let him out
at night sometimes
when everybody’s asleep.
I say, I know that you’re there,
so don’t be
sad.
then I put him back,
but he’s singing a little
in there, I haven’t quite let him
die
and we sleep together like
that
with our
secret pact
and it’s nice enough to
make a man
weep, but I don’t
weep, do
you?

My favorite Bukowski poem.

nprmusic:

CBC Music is ranking the old-timey-ness of the most old-timey-like artists.